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Table 3 Multiple linear regression analysis of the association of caffeinated coffee consumption with markers of liver injury when individuals consuming ≥ 1 alcoholic drink/day were excluded

From: Associations of coffee consumption with markers of liver injury in the insulin resistance atherosclerosis study

Outcome per unit increase in caffeinated coffee ALTab ASTab Fetuin-Aac NAFLD liver fat scoread
  β (95 % CI) p value β (95 % CI) p value β (95 % CI) p value β (95 % CI) p value
Model 1 −0.10 (−0.17, −0.03) 0.0046 −0.05 (−0.10, −0.01) 0.0280 0.02 (−0.04, 0.08) 0.47 −0.07 (−0.13, −0.02) 0.0070
Model 2 −0.11 (−0.18, −0.03) 0.0037 −0.05 (−0.10, −0.00) 0.0420 0.02 (−0.04, 0.08) 0.54 −0.06 (−0.11, −0.01) 0.0189
Model 3 −0.11 (−0.18, −0.04) 0.0037 −0.05 (−0.10, −0.00) 0.0330 0.03 (−0.04, 0.09) 0.41 −0.06 (−0.11, −0.01) 0.0298
Model 4 −0.08 (−0.16, −0.00) 0.0400 −0.03 (−0.08, 0.02) 0.20 0.03 (−0.04, 0.09) 0.44 −0.03 (−0.07, 0.02) 0.27
  1. Model 1: Age, sex, ethnicity
  2. Model 2: Adjusted as in model 1 + energy intake, energy expenditure, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption
  3. Model 3: Adjusted as in model 2 + whole grain consumption, vegetable intake, fruit intake, % energy from saturated fat, % energy from polyunsaturated fat, decaffeinated coffee consumption, regular soft drinks, lemonade/sweetened mineral water
  4. Model 4: Adjusted as in model 3 + insulin sensitivity
  5. aLog transformation;b n = 827 with slight variation across models;cn = 541 with slight variation across models; dn = 821 with slight variation across models